Novelling Music

I’ve just returned to the Rock from the City of Dreaming Spires, and besides being several thousand words behind in CampNaNo (having previously been on track for the full 50k, for the first time *disgruntled face*), I have mock exams tomorrow. Post upcoming about my impressions of the various universities I’ve visited.

In the meantime, here’s my writing ‘playlist’. Since January 2013 I’ve been progressively working my way through my dad’s music collection. That’s an average of perhaps twenty albums a week, no repeats, no skips (except maybe some opera). I’m in the N section!

Here’s a [highly condensed] selection of the tracks I’ve enjoyed thus far.

Jessica Allman Brothers Band
Life is for Living Barclay James Harvest
Love Burns Black Rebel Motorcycle Club
More Than A Feeling Boston
Piano Sonata No. 2 in B flat minor Chopin
Where Eagles Dare Ron Goodwin (played by Cambridge University Brass Band)
Call to the Dance Dan Ar Braz
Layla Derek and the Dominoes
New World Symphony Dvorak
Disenchanted Lullaby Foo Fighters
The Dark of the Matinee Franz Ferdinand
One in a Million Giles, Giles and Fripp
Eliza Blue Hat Fitz and Cara Robinson
Monkey Chant Jade Warrior
My God Jethro Tull
Pictures of a City King Crimson
Everybody Knows Leonard Cohen
Dream Mahavishna Orchestra
Ommadawn Part One Mike Oldfield
Change Your Mind Neil Young

Mike Oldfield’s music is the best I’ve found when it comes to novelling. No distracting lyrics, but so many instruments, styles and moods. You don’t have to keep changing track. And because sections are repetitive you can hum-jam (that’s now a thing).

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5 thoughts on “Novelling Music

  1. Chopin Sonata no.2. Aka the death march.
    Can’t say I’ve listened properly to many of your list. Oldfield is good. Tubular Bells guy.

    • Which incidentally–or not–features in the first line of Captain’s Paper.
      That’s right. Too many people leave it at ‘Exorcist’ and forget there’s another twenty-five beauteous minutes of Tubular Bells ❤

  2. Pingback: Studying is hard | Thinking Languages!

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